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Blairgowrie to Braemar


The southern entrance to the SnowRoads is known as Cateran Country.  As one of the largest towns in Perthshire, Blairgowrie sits on the banks of the River Ericht and is an ideal place to begin, or end, your SnowRoads adventure. It’s the main start point for the 64-mile circular Cateran Trail which offers a network of walking routes for all abilities and wildlife is frequently spotted at nearby lochs. Winding on your journey you can stop over at the Bridge of Cally and Glenshee for further access to walking and the opportunity to venture into the mountains. Glenshee is known in Gaelic as ‘Gleann Sith’, or Glen of the Fairies, due to its magical atmosphere and it caters for year-round sports against a wild and rugged backdrop. Part of the route here used to include a hair-raising, double-hairpin bend. It was so dangerous that it earned the nickname ‘The Devil’s Elbow’ but, much to the relief of motorists, it was bypassed when a section of the road was straightened.
Alyth
Alyth is a small and friendly village east of Blairgowrie which is home to several hidden gems including the Alyth Den, a great area for walking routes.
Blairgowrie
Blairgowrie a market town is one of the largest towns in Perthshire, sitting a short drive from Perth & Dundee on the banks of the River Ericht.
Bridge of Cally
The Bridge of Cally is a small village which sits at the junction of three glens, Glenshee, Strathardle and Glenericht and close to the Cateran Trail.
Glenshee
Glenshee offers some of the highest peaks in Scotland, fertile farmland and rolling hills, the rugged landscape is breath-taking.
Kirkmichael
Kirkmichael means ‘The Church of St Michael’, dating back over a thousand years and was at one time an important market in the cattle trade.
Braemar
In Braemar there’s an abundance of well-signposted, low-level walking which makes it a wonderful place for ramblers, who can look...